Oregon’s Stalemate Over Medical Cannabis

Yesterday’s News – May 12, 2015

 

medical marijuana 

 

Oregon Marijuana Committee Argues Over Local Control

The joint committee charged with implementing Oregon’s Initiative 91 can agree on almost everything, except the issue of local control over medical marijuana facilities. In order to prevent diversion of product to the black market, the group of lawmakers has worked together to craft medical marijuana regulations ahead of the rollout of recreational cannabis sales. They have reached consensus on most points but continue to disagree over whether local governments can ban facilities or whether such a move must be decided by voters. The Oregonian has complete details on the stalemate:

oregonlive.com/mapes/index.ssf/2015/05/marijuana_committee_runs_into.html

 

 

Ohio Legislators Hope to Forestall Legalization Measures

Ohioans are currently looking at three different ballot measures to legalize and regulate cannabis in 2015, and there’s rumor that state lawmakers are considering legislation that they hope would pull the rug out from under these initiatives. ResponsibleOhio, Better for Ohio, and Responsible Ohioans for Cannabis are all pushing to end marijuana prohibition, but with different proposals that reflect different implementation strategies. State legislators, on the other hand, want more restrictive laws and are willing to support legalization for medical purposes if it would make more sweeping reforms less popular. The Columbus Dispatch has the ins and outs of the situation in Ohio:

dispatch.com/content/stories/local/2015/05/11/legislators-look-to-make-push-to-legalize-marijuana-difficult.html

 

 

Tax Troubles

The New York Times sheds light on an issue many in the cannabis industry consider the biggest hurdle to both legitimacy and simply staying in business: tax code 280E. This obscure piece of tax law was adopted back in the 1980s, when a drug dealer in Minnesota argued in tax court that he should be allowed to write off expenses associated with his (illegal) cocaine and meth operation. The tax code, which forbids deductions and tax credits from “illegal trafficking in drugs,” applies to medical and recreational cannabis businesses because, despite their state legal status, they remain federally prohibited. Many business owners worry that high taxes will force them into bankruptcy. Here’s the full article:

nytimes.com/2015/05/10/us/politics/legal-marijuana-faces-another-federal-hurdle-taxes.html?_r=0

 

And another from Forbes:

forbes.com/sites/robertwood/2015/05/11/fed-propose-50-marijuana-tax-as-a-tax-cut/

 

 

State Medical Marijuana Updates

Pennsylvania: An expanded medical cannabis bill is up for vote in the Senate today and is likely to pass. The bill, which was recently amended to include a greater number of conditions and the option of vaporizing, has the support of Gov. Tom Wolf, though it would still have to make it through the House before it reaches his desk. Read the local coverage for more:

wtae.com/news/medical-marijuana-bill-heads-for-pennsylvania-senate-vote/32949254

 

Utah: A medical cannabis bill that died in the state Senate earlier this year will return to the legislature. Republican Sen. Mark Madsen plans to reintroduce the bill and hold community meetings and other forums in order to educate lawmakers and their constituents about the benefits of medical marijuana. Salt Lake City’s Fox affiliate has details:

fox13now.com/2015/05/11/medical-marijuana-bill-returns-to-the-utah-state-legislature/

 

 

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2 Comments

  1. Pingback: Weed in Texas Goes Commercial | Weekend Review Kit

  2. Pingback: Oregon Committee Passes Recreational Regulations | Weekend Review Kit

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